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Theology
Overview

London School of Theology is one of the largest Evangelical theological colleges in Europe with a strong academic reputation. Its identity is defined by four core values – the Gospel, Bible, Church and World. As a Gospel people, we want our lives, thoughts and actions to be shaped by God’s love for us as proclaimed in the Gospel; As a Bible people, we believe the Bible to be God’s inspired, living, transformative and life-giving word and made known, personally, to humanity in his Son Jesus Christ; As a Church people, we want to be involved in building churches that are focused on the Gospel and the Bible in their life, worship and mission and fuelled by the power of God’s Spirit; and, As a World people, we seek to witness to those of other faiths and none, as followers of Christ, as well as stewarding and renewing our environment, society and geopolitical reality in the light of the Gospel. We want to be part of God’s work in renewing this world.

These core values define who we are, what we aspire to be as an institution and the above-mentioned values are reinforced in our students through the courses we offer. The Theology programme lies at the centre of all our taught programmes and covers a wide range of subjects. It is dynamic, innovative and seeks to uphold the key foundational principles of the Evangelical faith.

Why Study Theology at LST?

The BA in Theology at LST is designed for people called with a view to serving churches, missions, schools and society at large. The programme is academically rigorous and enables you to gain a deeper understanding of Scripture and its relevance to the world around you. It addresses our changing cultural and intellectual climate and how the Christian faith relates incisively, relevantly and practically to society. Here at LST you will also have the privilege of studying alongside and interacting with students and staff respectively from different backgrounds and denominations, which enriches the whole study experience. In addition, you will experience personal spiritual growth partly through the taught programmes and the extracurricular activities organised by the student body.

Overall Structure of the Programme

Consider the BA Theology Curriculum map (click to download).

As you can see there are three levels of study corresponding to three years and the three possible exit points of the programme, including a CertHE after 60 credits, a DipHE after 120 credits or a BA Hons after 360 credits. At Level 4, you will take all the core modules, if you are a full time student you will take them all all in one year, if you are part time you would normally take these over two years. The order of the modules is indicative, but there clearly are some modules you need to take before others. There are no options in the first year. At Level 5 you will take all the modules in the red box, and a selection of options in the blue box. Again, if you are full time you will take them all in one year, if you are part time you would normally take these over two years. At Level 6 it is similar, you will take all the modules in the red box, and a selection of options in the blue box. Again, if you are full time you will take them all in one year, if you are part time you would normally take these over two years.

So if you are a full time student, you can work to graduate in 3 years. If you are a part-time student you will normally complete in 6 years. You will also have two practical placement modules that you will complete at levels 4 and 5 and a final dissertation project at level 6.

There is no room here to delve into the content of the modules, but in general you can find three broad categories in the curriculum, the first being biblical studies, the second theological studies and the third areas of praxis. At LST however we believe in theological education that is integrative which means modules are not set in rigid sub-disciplinary tracks but are in dialogue with each other on a shared matrix reference to the Bible, experience, tradition, reason, and community. It also means that we endeavour to characterise each module through elements of academic knowledge and understanding, spiritual formation and ministerial training.

Blended delivery now possible

LST now offers more choice to potential students wishing to study undergraduate theology and brings theological education within reach through greater accessibility. Most notably, LST’s BA Theology degree (also HE Cert and HE Dip) is offered both on campus and online. Whether you study on campus in London or remotely online, you will take the same courses, meet the same outcomes, do the same assessments, benefit from quality teaching and tutoring provision and graduate with the same degree.

All BA Theology students can combine any choice of delivery between on-campus and online modules. This means that you can study the same degree completely on-campus, completely online or in any blended combination of the two delivery modes. The latter is an exceptional form of blended delivery that allows you a huge variety of combinations, such as taking your first year on campus and the remaining online, or doing it the other way around, with an initial period of study online and then a seamless integration to on-campus study for the latter part of your degree. Visit the BA Theology online page to watch a video introducing LSTOnline, our virtual learning environment.

Theology, Music & Worship
Theology, Music & Worship and Theology & Worship

These two combined and integrated honours programmes are the only ones of their kind in Europe. A substantial core programme of theological studies is integrated with a wide range of music and worship modules.

Our established Theology, Music & Worship degree programme is offered at Certificate, Diploma, and Degree level. Specifically designed for musically gifted students interested in taking a combined and integrated study programme in theology, music and worship.

Download the LST prospectus page - THEOLOGY, MUSIC & WORSHIP

The newer Theology & Worship combined degree programme, also offered at Certificate, Diploma, and Degree level is designed for students who have obvious gifts in music but who come with limited experience in reading music or a confident grasp of general musicianship skills.

Download the LST prospectus page - THEOLOGY & WORSHIP

Students on both programmes study together the same theology core modules as well as a number of worship and/or music modules. They then take a series of alternative modules according to their chosen degree.

Download the LST prospectus page - OVERVIEW OF BOTH THEOLOGY & WORSHIP COURSES

Want to see LST students' and staff creativity? Check out our music & worship blog CODA

Music & Worship Department

The Music & Worship lecturing faculty includes:

Jeremy Perigo, Geraldine Luce (Latty), Christopher Grey, Richard Hubbard, Carey Luce, Steve Thompson

Our exceptional range of first-study tutors includes:

Natasha Andrews, Rob Cates, Tony Catterick, Andy Chamberlain, Fiona Gillett, Mike Haughton, Tom Hooper, Guy Houchen, David Lewis, Dan Partington, Celia Redgate, Steve Robbings, Nicki Rogers, Diana Stanbridge, Sarah Stroh, Matt Wells, Hayley Wild.

Guest Lecturers

Guest lecturers on a range of music and worship courses at LST have included: Jonny Baker, Jeremy Begbie, John Bell, Terl Bryant, Ian Collinge, Beth Croft, Brian Draper, Mark Earey, Nathan Fellingham, Paul Field, Andy Flannagan, Jason Gardner, Sam Hargreaves, Bryn Haworth, Nigel Hemming, Tim Hughes, Christopher Idle, Graham Kendrick, John Leach, Andrew Maries, Noel Richards, Christopher Redgate, Matt Redman, Sue Rinaldi, Noel Robinson, Scott Stroman, Phil Togwell, Stuart Townend, Jason Upton, Geoff Weaver, Matt Weeks, John Witvliet.

Flexible Study Options

The Theology, Music & Worship and the Theology & Worship courses can be completed to Certificate, Diploma or Degree level.

Each level provides an evenly weighted combination of theology, music and worship and is complete in itself, but also provides the foundation for the next year. You can also choose to study to your chosen level either full- or part-time.

For part-time students, the theology modules are completed in the first year of each level, with music and worship modules taken in the second year of each level. Part-time students come in for lectures two days per week.

Facilities

Music facilities at LST include five practice rooms, a networked Mac Suite with Logic, Sibelius and other software, two grand pianos, digital pianos, keyboards, guitars, drum kits. There is also a growing library of Music and Worship materials including sheet music and CDs.

Theology & Worship

This Theology & Worship combined degree programme is offered at Certificate, Diploma and Degree level. Designed for students who have obvious gifts in music but who come with limited experience in reading music or a less confident grasp of general musicianship skills.

Students graduating from this course are equipped to serve, for example, as church music directors, worship pastors, song writers, creative worship co-ordinators, freelance musicians and artists.

Download the Theology & Worship Prospectus page

Download the LST prospectus page - OVERVIEW OF BOTH THEOLOGY & WORSHIP COURSES

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

Cert HE in Theology & Worship [Level 4]

1 year full-time

2 years part-time

Dip HE in Theology & Worship [Level 5]

2 years full-time

4 years part-time

BA Hons in Theology & Worship [Level 6]

3 years full-time

6 years part-time

Theology, Music & Worship and Theology & Worship

These two combined and integrated honours programmes are the only ones of their kind in Europe. A substantial core programme of theological studies is integrated with a wide range of music and worship modules.

Our established Theology, Music & Worship degree programme is offered at Certificate, Diploma, and Degree level. Specifically designed for musically gifted students interested in taking a combined and integrated study programme in theology, music and worship.

Download the LST prospectus page - THEOLOGY, MUSIC & WORSHIP

The Theology & Worship combined degree programme, also offered at Certificate, Diploma, and Degree level is designed for students who have obvious gifts in music but who come with limited experience in reading music and desire a more confident grasp of musicianship skills.

Download the LST prospectus page - THEOLOGY & WORSHIP

Students on both programmes study together the same theology core modules as well as a number of worship and/or music modules. They then take a series of alternative modules according to their chosen degree.

Download the LST prospectus page - OVERVIEW OF BOTH THEOLOGY & WORSHIP COURSES

Want to see LST students' and staff creativity? Check out our music & worship blog CODA

Music & Worship Department

The Music & Worship lecturing faculty includes:

Jeremy Perigo, Geraldine Luce (Latty), Christopher Grey, Richard Hubbard, Carey Luce, Steve Thompson

Our exceptional range of first-study tutors includes:

Natasha Andrews, Rob Cates, Tony Catterick, Andy Chamberlain, Fiona Gillett, Mike Haughton, Tom Hooper, Guy Houchen, David Lewis, Dan Partington, Celia Redgate, Steve Robbings, Nicki Rogers, Diana Stanbridge, Sarah Stroh, Matt Wells, Hayley Wild.

Guest Lecturers

Guest lecturers on a range of music and worship courses at LST have included: Ruth Fazal, Brad Whiteley, Jonny Baker, Jeremy Begbie, John Bell, Terl Bryant, Ian Collinge, Beth Croft, Brian Draper, Mark Earey, Nathan Fellingham, Paul Field, Andy Flannagan, Jason Gardner, Sam Hargreaves, Bryn Haworth, Nigel Hemming, Tim Hughes, Christopher Idle, Graham Kendrick, John Leach, Andrew Maries, Noel Richards, Christopher Redgate, Matt Redman, Sue Rinaldi, Noel Robinson, Scott Stroman, Phil Togwell, Stuart Townend, Jason Upton, Geoff Weaver, Matt Weeks, John Witvliet.

Flexible Study Options

The Theology, Music & Worship and the Theology & Worship courses can be completed to Certificate, Diploma or Degree level.

Each level provides an evenly weighted combination of theology, music and worship and is complete in itself, but also provides the foundation for the next year. You can also choose to study to your chosen level either full- or part-time.

For part-time students, the theology modules are completed in the first year of each level, with music and worship modules taken in the second year of each level. Part-time students come in for lectures two days per week.

Facilities

Music facilities at LST include five practice rooms, a networked Mac Suite with Logic, Sibelius and other software, two grand pianos, digital pianos, keyboards, guitars, drum kits. There is also a growing library of Music and Worship materials including sheet music and CDs.

Theology & Counselling

The college is privileged to be the only institution in the United Kingdom offering this unique course called ‘Theology and Counselling’, a joint-honours degree programme combining studies in Theology and training in Counselling. The conviction behind our vision for the course is that Christian counselling needs to be solidly based on the Bible and theology - and vice versa - that our understanding of the Bible and of theology deepens as we become equipped, as interpreters, with the insights that counselling gives.

The Theology and Counselling course is accredited by the British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy (BACP), the main professional body for counselling in the UK. This is the only Christian Counselling course to meet the standards of their full professional scrutiny – and to that we add theological studies with teachers of world renown, in an institution with a long track record of providing the church in the UK and around the world with its future leaders. What more could you want?

Academically, the course is accredited by Middlesex University, so that on successful completion of the programme you will leave with a Middlesex University award. 

The Theology and Counselling course can be studied either full-time or part-time. Both the full-time and part-time versions of our course have been granted BACP Accreditation.

Who is it for?

It is for people interested in training for pastoral ministry or mission with a strong individual focus, and for people interested in becoming professional Christian counsellors with a well-laid foundation in the Bible and theology.

Structure

On the Certificate course [National Qualifications Framework Level 4], you will receive a thorough grounding in the theory and practice of the REMA Model of Counselling (which was conceived and birthed by us as a team, and commended by Middlesex University for its innovative and highly integrative nature), whilst also gaining exposure to other Christian and non-Christian models. At the same time you will begin to delve deep into the Bible and Christian Doctrine, gaining an overview of the biblical, historical and international story of God's people. These foundations on both sides of the programme are designed to help you grow professionally and personally, as well as academically. On successful completion of the Certificate, you will be ready to start seeing clients as a counsellor.

In the Diploma [NQF Level 5], you embark on actual counselling practice, supported by further training in counselling theory and skills. Practice and Supervision Groups are there to support you in your first steps as a counsellor. Alongside this you will be gaining deeper insights into theology and reflecting on how it fits with counselling, with specialist modules in Old and New Testament, in Christology, and in Interpreting the Bible today.

In both the Certificate and Diploma programmes you’ll be continually encouraged to integrate theology, counselling and spirituality, which will help you become integrative thinkers and practitioners, and grow in your understanding of how each discipline impacts the other.

The Degree [NQF Level 6] takes these processes even further. Students take a core module in Biblical Theology, which informs the work in the rest of the programme as we seek to integrate theological and counselling perspectives throughout. A key element of the year is the Project, which gives you the opportunity to focus on an area of interest and bring all your skills to bear on researching and writing.

Download the LST prospectus page - THEOLOGY & COUNSELLING

Programme Structure

Cert HE in Theology & Counselling [Level 4]

Dip HE in Theology & Counselling [Level 5]

BA Hons in Theology & Counselling [Level 6]

Undergraduate FAQ's
What course should I choose?

LST offers a broad range of theological education courses, that differ both in length, delivery mode and subject studied.  We aim a range of students from younger full time students, to part-time students and students that have jobs miniostry committments they cannot leave. You can study degree programems ranging from an HE Certificate in Theology (1 year full time, 2 years part time), to an HE Diploma Programme (2 year full time, 4 years part time), an BA Hons in Theology (3 year full time, up to 6 years part time) and a range of postgraduate programmes (taught and research master level courses) and doctoral studies (both PhD and a professional DProf).  In addition to core trainig in biblical studies, theololgy, hermeneutics and applied praxis, our programmes also have different pathways integrating theologically with a a variety of other subject areas.

We also offer a range of delivery options, from full time residential accomodation in our Northwood campus, to degrees delivered fully through self paced paper based courses or online delivery.   

All programmes have both academic and practical modules, but the Theology programme is the most suitable if you are considering going on to postgraduate study or a career in teaching, unless you already know that your academic career will be in one of our specialist practical areas.

What qualifications do I need to study at LST?

Click on the links below for more information on the entry requirements for our undergraduate courses.

Theology - Theology & Counselling - Theology, Music & Worship - Theology & Worship

How do I apply to LST?

Click here to find out about the application process.

When should I apply?

Between October and July for courses beginning in the following September/October. If you apply later, we’ll do our best to get you here for September of the same year, but some things can cause delay. You can help by making sure the people you quote for references know we will be contacting them, and are ready to send back the reference forms as soon as possible.

What happens after I've applied?

When we receive your application, we will contact your referees. We will also send you a Bible knowledge test, which you should complete and return as soon as possible. There are also specific questionnaires or tests relevant to Music or Counselling if you are applying for either of these courses. When we have received satisfactory references, we will then call you for interview.

Can I study part-time?

Yes! Part-time study is available for all three undergraduate courses. Please look at each course for more specific details.

What are the fees?

Click here to download the latest undergraduate fee sheet.

Can I get any help with funding?

Click here to find out more about finance and possible sources of funding.

Is LST part of UCAS and what is the UCAS number?

LST does not have a UCAS number, as it is a private college, and is not part of the UCAS system. We have our own application process and you need to apply to us separately.

What if English isn't my first language?

You will need to take the British Council IELTS test and achieve a test score of at least 6.5. You can take the IELTS test at any British Council office in your country, or at the British Embassy. Please send a copy of your test certificate with your application. You will also need to demonstrate a good level of spoken English at interview.

What if I'm applying from outside of the UK?

If you are applying from outside the UK we can normally arrange an interview for you in your home country, but this takes longer to organise, so you are strongly advised to submit your application at least nine months before your course begins – by the end of December for courses starting the following September if at all possible. Our British BA degree is at least equivalent to a US MDiv programme, in terms of breadth of study and academic level.

If you are applying for Theology & Counselling from overseas, we will ask you to complete an extra questionnaire, which will enable us to assess your suitability specifically for the Theology & Counselling programme here. Normally, we will only offer you a place for one year to start with, to allow you time to adjust and to improve your language skills, if necessary, during your first year. If all is well we will then offer you a place for the second and third year.

Who validates the degrees?

All programmes currently running at London School of Theology are validated by Middlesex University.

What facilities does LST have?

Please click here to find out more about the facilities LST offers, as well as facilities in the surrounding area.

Does LST provide accommodation?

LST does have on campus accommodation. Please click here for further information.

What if I have a disability?

We welcome applications from students with disabilities. For further information, please click here.

MA in Integrative Theology (MAiTh)
Summary of the Programme

The Master of Arts in Integrative Theology is truly a unique MA programme that seeks to foster a holistic approach to doing theology which rejuvenates both the study and practice of Christian theology for Church and world. We do so by aiming to form more holistic practi-tioners of theology by means of (1) the integration of the commonly recognised sources of theological knowledge: the programme prioritises the Bible (Scripture), recognises the histor-ical construction of Christian belief (Tradition), the importance of considered, critical thought (Reason), the role of experience (Experience) and the witness of the living community of faith (the Church) as it proclaims the Gospel and makes disciples. The programme also pursues the holistic doing of theology be means of (2) the integration of the theological sub-disciplines that are often studied as islands in themselves. We do so by seeking to bring into mutually enriching dialogue disciplines such as Biblical interpretation and theology, Systematic theology, Historical theology and Practical theology.

This programme is for you if:
  • You are a theology graduate seeking an innovated and flexible Masters-level qualifi-cation in theology;
  • You are contemplating PhD level work in theology or a related discipline and you are seeking a great foundation for doctoral research.
  • You are involved in ministry and are looking for a path of lifelong learning that will enhance your service;
  • You have never formally studied theology but wish to integrate your professional and personal interests with theological understanding.
MAITH Degree Structure

The MA Integrative Theology (180 credits) consists of two core modules, two optional modules and a final dissertation. The first core module will introduce you to an integrative approach to theology, and the second will demonstrate how an integrative approach to theology can be fruitfully applied to the person and work of Jesus Christ. The two optional modules can be chosen from the list below. Your dissertation can be undertaken in the area of your options or on some other topic relevant to integrative theology.

Post Graduate Diploma Integrative Theology (120 credits) consists of the two core modules and two optional modules

Post Graduate Certificate Integrative Theology (120 credits) consists of the first core module and one optional module

MAITH Optional Modules (2017-2018)

The following optional modules are for the academic year 2017-2018. Click the ‘Optional Module’ Tab here or above for the taught content of these modules.

  • The Gospel of Mark
  • The Holy Spirit in Luke-Acts and Paul
  • Trinitarian Personhood
  • Social Justice 1: Biblical Themes
  • Social Justice 2: Current Issues
  • Christian Worship
  • Issues in Contemporary Christian Worship
*Optional modules are subject to student interest in any given year
MODES OF STUDY: HOW WILL YOU LEARN?

Whether studying online or residentially, you will learn along with a cohort of other students who will move together through the programme’s elements.

Part-Time Study (MAiTh)

(2-3 years): Year one (Core module A plus Optional module A); Year two (Core module B plus Optional module B); Dissertation (at the end of Year two or three)

  • eLearning (2-3 years of study): Those who cannot leave their place of residence, job or ministry commitments can take the entire MAiTh by online distance learning (eLearning) through LST’s Virtual Learning Environment (VLE). Our VLE has been expertly designed in order to provide students with a rich blend of learning resources and participatory activities for a rich learning experience.
  • Residential Learning (2-3 years of study): If you live and work in the London area, you can travel to the LST campus once a week to attend seminars and then continue your studies during the week through LST’s Virtual Learning Environment.
Full-Time Study (MAiTh)

(1 year): Core A, Core B, Option A, Option B, Dissertation (October to October *We do not recommend that those without a good degree in theology to take this programme full-time.

  • Full-Time eLearning (1 year of study): MAiTh by online distance learning (eLearning) through LST’s Virtual Learning Environment
  • Full-Time Residential Learning (1 year of study): You will live in the London area and experience a vibrant learning and community life on the LST campus, engaging in classroom activities, seminars and personal interaction with your peers and tutors. You will also have access to both LST’s library - which is among the largest evangelical theological library in Europe - and to LST’s Virtual Learning Environment.
  • *The modes of study (online, residential, part-time, full-time) are subject to student interest in any given year.
    Entry Requirements

    In normal circumstances students will be required to have at least a UK BA Honours degree at 2:1 level (or equivalent) as well as the necessary English language ability. A qualification in Theology is not required.

    Find out more:

    Download the PDF GUIDE TO THE MAiTh, or for specific enquiries please contact email MAiTH.

    MA in Theological Education

    This distinctive set of programmes represents a unique opportunity for theological educators from all over the world to obtain much desired professional training in education. It is no secret that teachers in Bible colleges and seminaries all over the world are traditionally trained in theology but not necessarily in education. LST is working together with strategic international organisations involved in theological education to bridge this need and provide a series of highly flexible and internationally deliverable courses in the discipline of theological education.

    These programmes are for you if:
    • You are currently a theological educator teaching in a Bible college or seminary;
    • You are a theology graduate who is considering a vocation in theological education;
    • You are involved in leadership or academic responsibilities in a theological college, but have not professionally trained for these roles;
    • You want to deepen you awareness of what is distinctive (and theological) about theological education are re-discover your calling.
    No need to leave your occupation, no need to leave your country

    The programmes are designed in such a way that they are best taken while you are actively teaching where you are.  All courses have been conceived for those who are already involved in full time theological education anywhere in the world and are thus provided through a combination of  online distance education and reflective practice wherever students are. 

    How you will learn?

    You will learn by engaging in both aquisition and participation activities, most of which will shared with a cohort of students that will move together through the course website, engaging a variety of media during the week on different topics and then blogging and interacting in forums over the weekens. All the modules will be delivered in such a way that you will be learning with fellow students from all over the world under the guidance of a tutor.  Arrangements will also be made during the programme to be formally observed during your teaching in order to assist you in reflecting on your practice. Assessment will vary within the modules, with components such as reflective and critical essays, reflective practice reports, curricular projects, personal journalling, engagement with a variety of online tools and a final empirical research project (at MA level).  There will be no need to travel for final examinations.

    Three degrees: multiple entry and exit points for maximum flexibility

    * The programmes are currently only offered part-time 

    Entry Requirements and Intake dates

    Students enrolling in these postgraduate programmes are normally expected to have an honours degree in the field of theology and to be engaged in the vocation of theological education. The programme has two intake dates, one in October and one in April every year.  Applications should normally arrive two months prior to the desired start date.

    Imagine…

    Imagine knowledgeable and professional theological educators all over the world who can work both autonomously and within teams in a variety of contexts. Imagine theological educators who can adapt to change and generate new ideas while remaining faithful to the Biblical roots of their vocation.  Imagine theological educators who are rooted in critical reflection that enables them to solve problems and effectively engage in the vocation of theological education in their particular cultural context and so make a positive contribution to society. Imagine theological educators who have balanced the above goals with an integrated vision of holistic theological education and have taken responsibility to develop professionally and personally as men and women of God, both in character, interpersonal skills and spirituality.

    We have imagined just these things.

    Validation and Endorsements

    These programmes are validated by Middlesex University and have been developed through a close working relationship with the European Evangelical Accrediting Association. They are also warmly endorsed by the International Council for Evangelical Theological Education (ICETE), Overseas Council (OC) and key leaders involved in theological education across the globe.

    "I enthusiastically endorse LST’s new post-graduate programmes in theological education. These programmes have potential to nurture professional competency, institutional capacity, and educational effectiveness in evangelical theological education around the world." Dr Scott Cunningham (Dean of Leadership Development, Overseas Council)

    "Langham Partnership, with its international network of some 300 Langham Scholars engaged in theological education around the world, welcomes and fully endorses these plans for Postgraduate Studies in Theological Education. It is an initiative that has great potential to strengthen the methods and standards of one of the key functions of the church - the task of teaching and equipping those who will disciple and pastor God's people." Dr Chris Wright (International Director,  Langham Partnership International)

    Related Information

    To find out more about postgraduate training in theological education at LST, write to education@lst.ac.uk or watch a brief MATE Introductory Video

    The course consists of two 30-credit modules delivered through a combination of distance learning and intensives over the course of a year. There are two possible starting dates (October and April). Each module is supported by a website with interactive functionality to provide class contact.

    Perspectives in Theological Education (30 credits)
    • This module provides an introduction to the nature, purpose and problems of theological education both within the UK and internationally.  It also critiques some contemporary and near contemporary debates and expressions of theological education in order to elucidate key ideas and practices, with the explicit intention of providing a basis for the student’s critical judgment on his or her practice.  In addition, it explores historical and contemporary models and theories that relate to the nature and role of the theological educator in order to foster the development of practitioners that are professional, reflective, holistic and maturing

    Philosophy and Practice of Higher Education (30 credits)
    • The aim of this module is to critically relate theory and practice of higher education to theological education, on the understanding that there is an undeniable relationship between the two domains. The module will provide a historical overview of higher education and introduce students to the philosophy of higher education. In addition, students will critically examine the theories, tasks and practices of teaching and learning in higher education with a view to develop best practice.  Keeping a global audience in mind, students will be given the opportunity to investigate and critically analyse their own historical, philosophical and pedagogical contexts.
    Course Length

    PGCertTE: part-time 1 year

    Entry Requirements

    Students enrolling in postgraduate programmes are normally expected to have an honours degree in the field of theology and to be engaged in the vocation of theological education.

    In addition to the PGCertTE modules, students will take a further 60-credits delivered by distance learning over the course of a year. Distance learning modules will start in October and April each year lasting 5 months. The following three options are available*.

    Leadership and Management in Theological Education (30 credits)
    • This option is of interest to students involved in positions of leadership, management and administration within theological colleges.  The module will help develop critical knowledge and understanding of leadership, management and administration in a variety of contexts and will foster professional abilities that cohere with the ethos of theological education. In addition, the module aims to provide an overview of the purposes and practices of quality assurance management.

    Designing and Delivering Effective Theological Education (30 credits)
    • This module is designed for those who will be designing courses and curricula and wish to effectively implement a variety of delivery forms, including distance learning through educational technology. The aim of the module is to develop knowledge and understanding of curriculum models and theories, and of their relationship to course design and delivery methodologies, with the intention of fostering professional abilities in designing and delivering effective theological education. It is also rich in practical application, as it seeks to provide theoretical and practical instruction for the development of effective and transformative methodologies in theological education.

    Spiritual Formation and Character Education (30 credits)
    • The aspect of educating for being and not only for knowing and doing is an essential component of theological education, but one that has historically drifted into the extra curricular realm.  This module will explore themes and concepts of spiritual formation and character education, survey historical patterns and recent literature and seek out areas of application in the life and vocation of a theological educator. The module will also give students the opportunity to explore key texts from the rich heritage of literature in this field.

    * The options will be offered on a rotation basis, so in any given year two options will be available. Students can access any combination of options by choosing the dates of entry. 

    Course Length

    PGDipTE: part-time 2 years

    Entry Requirements

    Students enrolling in postgraduate programmes are normally expected to have an honours degree in the field of theology and to be engaged in the vocation of theological education.

    This is the third (highest) exit award of LST's Postgraduate Educational studies for theological educators. To be awarded the MA in Theological Education, students must complete 120-credits from the PGCertTE and PGDipTE as well as a 60-credit educational research module dealing with research in theological education.

    Researching Theological Education (60 credits)
    • This module explores the concepts and principles that underpin the process of educational research.  There is emphasis on developing the critical skills that will facilitate students in their understanding, use and creation of research within the context of theological education. The module will additionally provide students with the opportunity to develop specific research skills and will culminate with a research-based thesis within the field of theological education.
    Course Length

    MA in Theological Education: part-time 3-4 years.

    Entry Requirements

    Students enrolling in postgraduate programmes are normally expected to have an honours degree in the field of theology and to be engaged in the vocation of theological education.

    Are you not able to commit to an entire degree? All courses of the MA in Theological education can be studied as single courses for credit or audited for personal development, without having to enrol in a programme, commit to completing assessments, earn credit or pay full fees. Auditing a course for personal development currently costs only £170!

    Current courses in theological education that can be studied for credit as single courses of audited for personal development
    • Spiritual Formation and Character Education (24 April – 1 September).   Engage in critically evaluating schools and approaches in the area of spiritual formation and character education, their relationship with academic and ministerial formation and their application to contemporary situations. Although the course is particularly aimed at contexts of theological education (Bible schools, theological seminaries, etc), many of the topics dealt with are easily transferrable to other educational contexts and church contexts.

    • Perspectives in Theological Education (24 April – 1 September).  If you are you involved in theological education or teaching theology in school, mission or church contexts, this course will greatly enhance your professional impact by deepening your understanding of the history, nature, purpose, problems, contemporary debates and emerging models of theological education.

    • Philosophy and Practice of Higher Education (2 October 2017 – 2 March 2018).  This course has two parts.  The first explores contemporary theories and practices in adult education, evaluates them theologically and applies them to renew and revise contexts of theological education. The second provides theological reflection on critical areas of the philosophy of higher education as well as tools for engagement in developing theologies of theological education.

    • Leadership and Management in Theological Education (2 October 2017 – 2 March 2018).  If you are a leader or manager in theological education and have only ever engaged with academic study in theology – leaving you untrained and unprepared as a professional leader – you are not alone.   This course provides a dynamic engagement from global experts with a number of issues around leadership, with a particular view to application in educational leadership in the context of theological education.

    For information write Education or Admissions

    Auditing courses for personal development (without assessment) costs about 1/6 less than regular fees (exact prices in the application form below).  Studying a single course for credit (but without enrolling in the Middlesex Validated programme) costs the same regular fees. If you wish to apply please complete the Auditing Student Application Form - MA TE below and attach it to an email to Education and Doreen Rosser
    Application Form - MA TE

    MA in Aspects and Implications of Biblical Interpretation

    The MA in Aspects and Implications of Biblical Interpretation is offered entirely and exclusively by distance education, with a specific focus on a range of issues of exegesis and interpretation

    Since 2001 LST has offered the MA in Aspects and Implications of Biblical Interpretation entirely by distance learning. Specifically designed with distance learning students in mind, the study material enables you to engage with a range of issues of exegesis and interpretation. Regularly evaluated and revised it remains an innovative and challenging qualification to help prepare you for your next step.

    Who is it for?

    The course is designed to help you upgrade the analytical and evaluative skills you acquired through your undergraduate studies. You will learn how to use these to relate Scripture to the contemporary world, as well as to your own spirituality, past experience and future ministry. It is especially relevant for Christians in several different types of ministry and work:

    - Teachers and practitioners who want to update their knowledge and acquire skills of interpretation relevant to their roles.
    - Those engaged in, or preparing for, theological teaching in cross-cultural or multi-faith contexts.
    - Theological graduates thinking about undertaking a research degree and wanting to develop their understanding of hermeneutics and biblical interpretation to Master's level.
    - Internationals who trained outside the UK but who want to gain a cross-cultural benefit from the style of academic discipline in theology practised in the British university system at postgraduate level.

    Course Content

    The programme consists of four parts: three modules and a written dissertation of 15,000 – 20,000 words.

    • - Hermeneutics (core)
    • - The Holy Spirit and Spiritual Gifts (option)
    • - Theology of the Poor (option)
    • - Old Testament Theology in Context (option)
    • - Qur'anic and post-Qur'anic Interpretation of Biblical Themes (option)
    • - Dissertation (Your dissertation will demonstrate your ability to gather relevant data and apply critical powers of analysis andevaluation in an extended piece of writing, thus creating a platform for further research).

    Note: If you do not wish to write a dissertation, you can discontinue your studies after completing the three modules and leave with a Postgraduate Diploma qualification. Almost all students are initially registered for the PGDip, with progress to the MA dependent on satisfactory marks in the modules.

    Delivery

    The MA-AIBI is only delivered by distance education through printed materials. with plans to make its materials available through LSTOnline as well.  You can begin at any time and you will study on your own in a self-paced manner with the assistance of a tutor.

    If you'd like to find out more, email Doreen Rosser

    Downloads
    Master of Theology (MTh)

    Full-time: 1 year Part-time: 2 years Assessment: Thesis of up to 40,000 words and oral examination (viva)

    Who is it for?

    The degree is aimed at those who have already completed formal theological training - they might be theology graduates, ministers, missionaries, Religious Education teachers, or business people as well as potential PhD students.

    It is particularly suitable for those who cannot commit themselves to the regular structure of a taught Master’s course, or to the length of time necessary for a PhD.

    Summary

    LST offers research supervision for the MTh degree in collaboration with Middlesex University, which awards the degree. The MTh is a first research degree, combining training in research and writing skills. Candidates for this degree follow a programme of study approved by the Director of Research and write their thesis on an approved topic in one of the major theological disciplines. The thesis must be an independent contribution to knowledge by the discovery of new facts or a distinct critical survey of knowledge. It must be well argued and be appropriately presented with clarity and conciseness of expression. It is possible to transfer to either MPhil or PhD registration with the agreement of the supervisor(s) and the Director of Research.

    Why embark on an MTh?

    It is an ideal course if you want to dig deep into one particular area rather than exploring the wider variety of questions posed by the MA.

    The MTh can provide a chance to reflect in more depth on experience you have had in your job or ministry; and for pastors to address their congregations with necessary expertise and critical judgement.

    An MTh provides an excellent apprenticeship in research and research writing for those who wish to progress to a PhD programme. It is also ideal preparation for a future in teaching, writing and pastoral work.

    If you’d like to find out more or have an informal discussion, email sandra.khalil@lst.ac.uk.

    Recent MTh theses

    Bridget Adams, Christ in the Market Place: Developing an Authentically Christian Model of Business Chaplaincy

    Heather Churchill, Who am I? A Reflection to the Topic of Personhood from the Disciplines of Theology, Psychology and Neuroscience

    Tim Creber, A Dialogue with Nicholas Wolterstorff: An Outline, Assessment and Development of Some Key Aspects of Wolterstorff’s Thought in Relation to Religious Belief and Behaviour

    Elizabeth Grove, Women in Islam: Scriptural Perspectives and Modern Arguments

    Akhtar Injeeli, Sufism and Military Jihad: A Critique of the Prevailing View of Non-violent and Pacifist Sufism

    Jonas Kurlburg, Aspects of Contemporary Free Church Ecclesiology

    Kirk Poth, The Significance of the Church’s Prayer Life in Acts and its Role in Paraenesis and Salvation History

    Dennis Raj, Christians in Malaysia: A Critical Evaluation of their Religious Rights with Specific Reference to the Islamic Legal Concept of Dhimma

    Joseph Sverker, The Holy Spirit and the icon: a critical consideration of Eastern Orthodox Theology of the icon in relation to Orthodox Pneumatology.

    Master of Philosophy (MPhil)

    Full-time: 2 years Part-time: 3 years Assessment: Thesis of up to 40,000 words and an oral examination (viva).

    Who is it for?

    This degree is aimed at those who have already completed formal theological training - they might be theology graduates, ministers, missionaries, Religious Education teachers, or business people as well as potential PhD students.

    Summary

    LST offers research supervision for the MPhil degree in collaboration with Middlesex University, which awards the degree. For an MPhil you need to offer a careful and critical investigation and evaluation of an approved topic, and demonstrate an understanding of the research methods appropriate to your chosen field. Your thesis does not necessarily need to be ‘original’; however, it must offer a distinctive independent contribution to knowledge, including the ability to critique new ideas and a sense of proportion in evaluating evidence and scholarly interpretations which is ultimately worthy of publication. While you would normally be expected to read the language of your primary sources for an MPhil, you would not be expected to engage with untranslated secondary literature. It is possible to transfer to PhD registration with the agreement of the supervisor(s) and the Director of Research.

    If you’d like to find out more or have an informal discussion, email Sandra.Khalil@lst.ac.uk.

    Recent MPhil theses

    Rosemary Ashley, An Investigation into Authority in the Church from a Biblical Perspective

    Katarina Almonte, The link between Charismatic Experiences and Revelation in John’s Gospel

    Berhane Asmelash, The History of the Khatmiyyah Tariqah of Eritrea and the Impact of its Rituals and Ceremonials on Pre-existing Beliefs and Practices of the People of Eritrea

    Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

    Thesis of up to 80,000 words and an oral examination (viva).

    Why embark on a PhD?

    Undertaking doctoral research at London School of Theology provides you with the opportunity to be involved in research at the cutting edge of the theological disciplines. You will have the opportunity to furnish both the worldwide church and the academic community with expertise that will carry the best traditions of evangelical Christian scholarship into the next generation and enable you to teach at tertiary level.

    Summary

    LST offers research supervision for the PhD degree in collaboration with Middlesex University, which awards the degree. A PhD thesis must show the ability to test ideas and critically investigate your chosen area. You need to offer a substantial fresh discovery or analysis, to argue some new critical hypothesis, or to provide substantial new arguments for an older one. Ultimately your research must result in an independent and original contribution to knowledge in your chosen discipline, which, in principle, is worthy of publication. By the time your thesis is submitted, you should be able to show that your competence in your chosen area is comparable with that of the experts. PhD candidates are expected to have the ability to interact with their primary sources in the original languages (e.g. Hebrew or Greek) as well as with secondary material in the main research languages (English, French and German). Languages required will vary considerably according to the area of study and some may require no foreign languages.

    If you’d like to find out more or have an informal discussion, email sandra.khalil@lst.ac.uk.

    Recent published PhD theses

    Michael C. Voigts, Letters of Ascent: Spiritual Direction in the Letters of Bernard of Clairvaux (Wipf and Stock, 2013)

    Daniel Lé, The Naked Christ (Wipf and Stock, 2012)

    Philip D. King, Surrounded by Bitterness: Image Schemas and Metaphors for Conceptualizing Distress in Classical Hebrew (Pickwick, 2012)

    Volker Rabens, The Holy Spirit and Ethics in Paul (Mohr Siebeck, 2010)

    Rainer Schacke, Learning from Willow Creek? Church Services for Seekers in German Milieu Contexts (Göttingen, Cuvillier Verlag, 2009)

    André Munzinger, Discerning the Spirits: Theological and Ethical Hermeneutics in Paul (SNTS monograph series; Cambridge University Press, 2007)

    Hyung Dae Park, Finding Herem? A Study of Luke-Acts in the Light of Herem (Library of NT Studies; T&T Clark, 2007)

    Andy Partington, Church and State: the Contribution of the Church of England Bishops to the House of Lords during the Thatcher Years (Paternoster 2006)

    Nicholas P. Lunn, Word Order Variation in Biblical Hebrew Poetry (Paternoster, 2006)

    Martin Parsons, Unveiling God: Contextualizing Christology for Islamic Culture (William Carey Library, 2005)

    Kiwoong Son, Zion Symbolism in Hebrews. Hebrews 12:18-24 as a Hermeneutical Key to the Epistle (Paternoster, 2005)

    Sorin Sabou, Between Horror and Hope. Paul's Metaphorical Language of ‘Death’ in Romans 6:1-11 (Paternoster, 2005)

    Patrick Mitchel, Evangelicalism and National Identity in Ulster, 1921-1998 (Oxford University Press, 2003)

    The lists below give an indication of the main areas of interest among our research supervisors; follow the links to individual supervisors’ profiles to find out each one’s more specific interests. Projects that fall outside these areas will also be considered.

    Old Testament

    Exegesis and theology of the Pentateuch, the Deuteronomistic History, Wisdom literature, Hebrew poetry, Psalms, the prophetic literature; OT and biblical theology; OT interpretation and hermeneutics; Hebrew language; discourse analysis of OT texts

    Supervisors: Jean-Marc Heimerdinger, Alison Lo, John Wilks

    New Testament

    Criticism and theology of Mark, Luke-Acts, John, the Pauline letters, Hebrews and Revelation; Pauline theology; NT theology, especially God, Christology, pneumatology, ecclesiology, missiology; aspects of New Testament hermeneutics (e.g. the contribution of linguistics, use of the OT in the NT); historical Jesus studies; social-historical, sociological, narrative-criticial and theological approaches to the New Testament; Greek language and linguistics; textual criticism

    Supervisors: Max Turner, Conrad Gempf, Steve Motyer, Andrew Perriman, Julie Robb, William Atkinson, Tim Carter

    Linguistics and biblical studies

    Discourse analysis; translation theory and practice, contrastive linguistics

    Supervisors: Max Turner, Jean-Marc Heimerdinger

    Church history and historical theology

    Patristics; Bernard of Clairvaux; Augustine; Reformation studies; Calvin; nineteenth-century Scottish theology; twentieth-century theology; Walter Rauschenbusch; Reinhold Niebuhr; Jürgen Moltmann; Pentecostalism and charismatic Christianity

    Supervisors: Tony Lane, Graham McFarlane, Paul Helm, William Atkinson,Don Horrocks, Matthew Knell, Richard Snoddy

    Systematic and philosophical theology

    Trinitarian theology; Christology; Holy Spirit; anthropology; soteriology and atonement; justification; original sin; ecclesiology; sacraments; Scripture and tradition; development of doctrine; personhood; aesthetics; theology and culture; modernity; post-modernity; theological education; Catholic-Protestant dialogue; theological method; Pentecostalism; pentecostal theologies

    Supervisors: Graham McFarlane, Tony Lane, Anna Robbins, Paul Helm,William Atkinson, Don Horrocks, Tim Carter, Marvin Oxenham

    Applied theology and ethics

    Theology and contemporary culture; personhood; ethical method; social ethics; environmental theology; ecumenical ethics; ethical dialogue; theology and moral philosophy; medical ethics; Christian ministry, especially charismatic ministries; issues relating to mental health; women in ministry; Pentecostal distinctives and practices, especially in the UK

    Supervisors: Graham McFarlane, William Atkinson, Don Horrocks, James Heard, Ian Stackhouse, Marvin Oxenham

    Music and Worship

    Explore the heart of worship and all that music brings to the spiritual experience

    Supervisors: Jeremy Perigo

    Christian worship and preaching

    Practice and theology of Christian worship; preaching and homiletics

    Supervisors: John Wilks

    Mission theology and history

    History and theology of Christian mission; contemporary missiology; contextual theology; contemporary UK evangelism

    Supervisors: Mark Beaumont, Andrew Kirk, Chris Wigram, James Heard

    Judaism

    Jewish biblical exegesis, ancient and modern; modern Jewish theology

    Supervisor: Jean-Marc Heimerdinger

    Islamics and Christian-Muslim relations

    Qur'anic studies; Sufism; prophethood; history of Islam; transmission of Islam to the Far East; Islamic radicalism; Christian-Muslim apologetics; identity politics

    Supervisors: Mark Beaumont, Sean Oliver-Dee, Keith Small

    Gender and Sexuality

    Gender Studies; Human Sexuality

    Supervisors: Don Horrocks,  Andrew Perriman

    Pentecostal and Charismatic Studies

    Lukan Pneumatology; NT Pneumatology; Pentecostal History, Theology and Practice; Charismatic Theology and Practice; Word-Faith Movement; Contemporary Charismatic Evangelism

    Supervisors: Max Turner, William Atkinson, James Heard, Andrew Perriman

    Theological Education

    Theological Education; Theology of Education; Philosophy of Education; Curriculum in Theological Education; Teaching and Learnign in Theological Education; Leadership and Management in Theological Education; Spiritual Formation; Character Education; This is a unique opportunity of interdisciplinary doctoral research that will contribute to meeting the need for scholarly and theological engagement with contextual educational issues in both theory and practice in many theological colleges, in theological education networks and theological accreditation agencies across the world.  The aim of the PhD programme is to nourish local intellectual leadership and resources for schools across the globe in order to deal with urgent questions of educational renewal and strategic thinking.  Read the following blog post for more detail on the nature of research proposals being sought: Ingredients for a PhD in theological education.  Typical applicants will be leaders or faculty in theological colleges, seminaries, Bible college movements and emerging forms of theological education as well as leaders in international theological education networks and quality assurance agencies. Please contact Dr Marvin Oxenham at education@lst.ac.uk 

    Supervisors: Graham Cheesman,  Marvin Oxenham

    Our scholarships have all been awarded at this present time. Do keep checking on the website for future awards.

    LST has a large number of research supervisors covering a wide variety of research subjects.

    From LST's own Faculty, the research supervisors include:

    William Atkinson, Jeremy Perigo, Conrad Gempf, Tony Lane, Graham McFarlane, Marvin Oxenham, Julie Robb, and Max Turner.

    Associate Research Fellows

    Dr Graham Cheesman BD (London) MPhil (CNAA) PhD (QUB)

    Graham was, until recently, the Director of the Centre for Theological Education in Belfast, before that, the Principal of a Bible College, a missionary and a pastor. He is a staff worker in Europe for the European Evangelical Accrediting Association and has acted as lecturer and consultant in theological education in various parts of the world. He has published three books and a number of articles and is editor of one journal and consulting editor of another, in the subject of theological education.

    Graham is interested in supervising PhD and other post-graduate students in the area of theological education. He has supervised students in such areas as concepts in theological education, theological education and distance learning, training of missionaries, church and seminary relations, women in theological education and contextualisation of theological education. He has special knowledge of the European and African situations but has supervised doctoral students from Europe, Africa, North America, India and the Far East. He greatly enjoys supervising studies of a local situation in theological education, bring to bear on it ideas of good practice and good thinking in the subject.

    Dr Sean Oliver-Dee BA PGCE (London) MTh (Brunel) PhD (Middlesex)

    Sean completed his PhD in British engagement in issues of Islamic governance in the Summer 2008 at LST. Since then he has worked freelance, writing papers for apolitical think-tank and NGO's. He delivered the LST level 3 Islam in the Modern World course in 2007/8 and continues to take seminars and lectures on an occasional basis at the School.

    In addition to his work at LST, Sean is also Associate Researcher for the Anglican Representative to the European Union. He is a regular consultant for government on identity issues and has written several papers for NGO’s and think-tanks and his PhD was published by Rowman and Littlefield in August 2009.

    Sean is interested in supervising research students in the field of Islamic identity and authority issues. This could focus on the theology of authority and/or political theory. It could also focus on modern salafist philosophy, both in India and in the Middle East. Sean's own research has examined Western governmental engagement with such Islamic governance as well as examining questions of citizenship and identity for both Christians and Muslims.

    Rev Dr Keith Small BA (Western Michigan University) ThM (Dallas Theological Seminary) PhD (Brunel)

    His PhD is in Islamics through London School of Theology. Dr Small has taught undergraduate and postgraduate levels in Britain and internationally concerning Islamics and Christian ministries to Muslims. In addition to his academic credentials he has almost twenty years of ministry experience to Muslims in the UK. Keith is a visiting Lecturer and Associate Research Fellow at LST. 

    Keith is interested in supervising research students in Qur'anic textual criticism, comparative textual criticism between the New Testament and the Qur'an, comparative topics concerning the Bible and the Qur'an, and areas of comparative Islamic and Christian theology.

    Dr Chris Wigram BA MA (CNAA) PhD (The Netherlands)

    Chris has taught both English and Religious Education at Secondary level, and worked for Operation Mobilisation, both in the UK and in the Philippines. Up until 2008, Chris was OMF International’s UK Director. He is now the International Director for European Christian Mission International (ECMI). Chris has been a visiting lecturer in Malaysia and both a member and chair of Global Connections Board. He has authored many articles for OMF’s East Asia’s Billions and Mission News magazine as well as ECMI’s internal magazine.

    Paul Helm BA MA (Oxon)

    Paul Helm was Professor of History and Philosophy of Religion at King’s College, London, 1993-2000. Previous to that he was a Reader in Philosophy at the University of Liverpool, where he taught for many years. He is now a Teaching Fellow at Regent College, Vancouver, where he was J.I.Packer Professor of Philosophical Theology 2001-5. He also teaches at the Highland Theological College. Among his books are Eternal God (1988), The Providence of God (1993), Belief Policies (1994), and three books on John Calvin: John Calvin’s Ideas (2004), John Calvin: A Guide for the Perplexed (2008) and Calvin at the Centre (forthcoming). 

    Paul is interested in supervising research students in Philosophy of Religion, Systematic Theology and Theology of the Reformation. Paul's interests are in all aspects of philosophical theology and in any Christian theological views that have philosophical implications.  In particular, he is currently interested in God's relation to time (with reference to theories of the temporal order) and philosophical aspects of the ideas of John Calvin. He approaches these in an unabashedly analytic mode, and so his intellectual connections and sympathies are more with Reformed Orthodoxy and medievalism than with modern 'continental' philosophy. He has supervised a wide range of theses, and among his current students are those studying Scottish philosophy and theology, the thought of John Calvin, free-will theologies and their implications, and the religious ideas of David Hume.

    Andrew Kirk BD (London) BA (Cantab) MPhil (London) AKC (King's College, London) PhD (Nijmegen)

    Andrew’s whole working life has been in teaching at a postgraduate level in different forms of adult education. He has wide experience in teaching in a cross-cultural situation, teaching in Spanish for twelve years in Argentina and doing lecture tours in the USA, Africa, Asia, Melanesia and Australasia.

    Andrew has taught for 40 years in an academic environment, including 9 years in relation to University of Birmingham programmes. Whilst in Birmingham, he also supervised people for the degrees of MPhil, ThD and PhD.

    His most recent teaching responsibilities have been as a visiting lecturer in the MTh mission programme of the Protestant Institute for Mission Studies in Budapest, in the MA in Contextual Missiology programme of the International Baptist Theological Seminary (IBTS) in Prague and the MA programme of the Baptist Faculty, University of Bucharest. Andrew has also been involved in advising research students on their projects. He is currently supervising 4 students doing PhD research at the Oxford Centre for Mission Studies, the International Baptist Theological Seminary (Prague) and the London School of Theology, and 1 student doing a D.Min. through Carey Baptist College in Vancouver.

    Andrew is interested in supervising research students doing research in the field of Missiology, in particular issues to do with the Theology of Mission, the Contextualisation of the Gospel, Witness in a Secular Environment, Apologetics, Interreligious matters (especially touching Islam and the West) and Latin American Theology and Mission.

    Bishop Michael J Nazir-Ali BA (Karachi) BLitt (Oxon) MLitt (Cantab) ThD (Australian College of Theology, NSW) DD (Lambeth)

    Bishop Michael Nazir-Ali was the 106th Bishop of Rochester, for 15 years, until 1 September 2009.  He is originally from Asia and was the first non-white Diocesan Bishop in the Church of England.  He was appointed in 1994.  Before that he was the General Secretary of CMS from 1989-1994.  He holds both British and Pakistani citizenship and from 1999 was a member of the House of Lords where he was active in a number of areas of national and international concern.  He has both a Christian and a Muslim family background and is now President of the Oxford Centre for Training, Research, Advocacy and Development (OXTRAD).

    Michael has been a visiting lecturer in a number of universities and colleges in the UK, Canada, the USA and Australia.  He has travelled widely in Africa, Asia, Australia, Europe, North and South America.

    He is the author of ten books and of numerous articles on Mission, Ecumenism, the Anglican Communion, and relations with people of other faiths (particularly Islam).  In 2005, he was awarded the Paul Harris Fellowship by Rotary International.

    Michael is interested in the following areas of research: Mission and Dialogue, Islam: history, Christian-Muslim Relations, Sufism, Shari'a, Anglican Communition, Ecumenicalism especially Anglican-Roman Catholic Dialogue and United churches.

    Normally you should have a good Honours degree (2:1 or above for the MTh, MPhil and PhD) in a theological, biblical or related subject. If you have taken a second theological degree (e.g. a British MA in Biblical or Theological Studies) you will find yourself much better equipped for a research degree.

    If your degree is in some other discipline, you may be considered if you can show evidence of suitable formal theological education, such as a British DipHE. Work experience can be considered in place of qualifications in some circumstances.

    For a North American Master’s degree, you should have a GPA of at least 3.6 for the MTh and at least 3.8 for the MPhil.

    Candidates registered for the MTh or the MPhil whose work proves to be of the appropriate standard may (with the agreement of their supervisor(s) and the Director of Research) transfer of registration, to MPhil or to PhD respectively.

    Registration for a PhD programme: as is normal in UK universities, you will initially be registered for ‘MPhil with a view to PhD’. Formal transfer to PhD registration normally takes place when you are about a year (of full-time study) away from its completion.

    Those seeking registration with qualifications other than those indicated above should write to the Research Programmes Administrator (sandra.khalil@lst.ac.uk) at London School of Theology, giving full details of their qualifications and (where appropriate) providing photocopies of relevant transcripts.

    If English is not your first language you will need to arrange to take the British Council’s English test. We cannot confirm your place until you have produced an IELTS test report and reached a score of 7.0 (all individual elements should be 6.5 or higher) or an equivalent English language proficiency report. There are many test centres, easily sourced on the internet. Your proficiency in English will also be considered at interview. 

    BA Theology Online

    As of Autumn 2016, LST's BA Theology (and HE Cert, HE Dip Theology) will be delivered by blended learning, with the possibility of taking the entire degree online.

    Overview

    As of 2016 LST will offer more choice to potential students wishing to study undergraduate theology and bring theological education within reach through greater accessibility.  Here are some of the main changes.

    1. LST’s BA Theology degree (also HE Cert and HE Dip) will be offered both on campus and by distance education.  Whether you study on campus in London or remotely online, you will take the same courses, meet the same outcomes, do the same assessments, benefit from quality teaching and tutoring provision and graduate with the same degree. 
    2. LST’s distance education will be offered online, through a virtual learning environment featuring careful, varied and interactive learning design. We are committed to giving you the opportunity of a rich educational experience in which you will not only interact with top class course materials and electronic resources and media, but also engage in fruitful relationships and dialogue both with your tutors and fellow students within a digital learning community.  
    3. All BA Theology students will be able to combine any choice of delivery between on-campus and online modules. This means that you can study the same degree completely on-campus, completely online or in any blended combination of the two delivery modes. This is an exceptional form of blended delivery that allows you a huge variety of combinations.
    4. LST’s online undergraduate provision impacts our specialised degrees in music, worship and counselling making it possible to combine on-campus and online study in these degrees as well, typically by taking theology modules online and specialism modules on-campus.
    Delivery information

    Online education can be done in many ways, and surely have many practical questions, such as when will courses begin, when will I study what and what sort of pacing can I expect? here is some initial information:

    First of all, the BA Theology delivered online has one intake point in Autumn each year.  This is exactly like the on-site BA, meaning that you need to apply during the Summer in order to be offered a place.  Secondly, the the BA Theology delivered online runs on two semesters, again, like the on-site BA.  The first semester roughly runs from October to January and the second semester from February to June every year.  Depending on whether you are full time or part time, each semester you will complete either 60 or 30 credits.

    Thirdly, each module in the BA in Theology is paced within an academic calendar.  So whereas there are no synchronous events and you are free to study at your own pace and time within each week, you must keep up with the calendar and complete the prescribed units every week.  Fourthly, each module will have assessment pieces (typically an essay, project or an exam) and assessment deadlines. Usually this deadline falls a few weeks after the prescribed weeks of paced study to give you time to write your essay or prepare for your exam.  In terms of workloads, you need to calculate that industry standard in the university for full time study means a commitment of about 35 hours of study per week.  Part time study means a commitment to about 18 hours of study each week, so be sure you plan carefully to make sure you have the necessary time to engage well with tertiary level education. Of course as in any higher education system, there are allowances for extenuating circumstances which are carefully explained in your induction. 

    LSTOnline - the virtual learning environment

    In the video below you will review the information given above and be introduced to LST’s virtual learning environment: LSTOnline.  This is built on the most popular learning platform in the world (Moodle) to which we have applied careful learning design to produce carefully thought out learning experiences for you.  Online learning is a blend of engagement between you as a student and resources, your tutor and other students. In each module you can therefore expect to find course narratives that will lead you as you engage with many texts and resources. You will watch video explanations, read books and journal articles, and search and engage with scholarly sources on the Internet within a scaffolded learning framework.  But you will not be alone and you can also expect to learn in community, and each module has a variety of communication tools that will allow you to relate to your module tutor with questions and further dialogue as well as with your fellow students as you construct your learning together and learn from each other’s contexts.  So you will be able to chat personally, place general comments for the entire cohort to see or participate in critical conversation in discussion forums.  

    Each cohort will be assigned a tutor with proven experience and high standard theological qualifications.  Tutors will interact with you on a weekly basis and walk with you through your learning journey, providing answers, guidance and relational encouragement. We trust that the virtual learning environment will soon become a friendly home, where you can learn and flourish together with others.

    FAQ
    1. What sort of device will I need?  You will be able to access your course materials and communicate with fellow on multiple devices, including personal computers, tablets and smart phones.
    2. Will I need a good internet connection?  Normally yes, but the modules are structured to allow full fruition even in conditions of low bandwidth or sporadic internet availability.  This means that there are normally no ‘network hungry’ synchronous learning events such as webinars and that we often prefer text to video content.  You will however need to regularly access the virtual learning environment to access materials and participate in the discussion forums.
    3. Do I need to be a computer expert?  Normally not.  Although the world of learning on the internet offers a fast growing array of tools and possibilities, we have selected tools that are foundational and that you will quickly learn how to use.  Our desire is to have you learn theology, not IT (although you surely will also grow in your digital literacy as a side outcome of your studies).  In any case, all first year students will be provided with a robust online induction session that will get you up to speed with some basic skills and understanding of how your online study will work and how to move around the virtual learning environment.  By the end of the first semester, you will be a whiz!
    4. Will I need to have access to a library or will I need to purchase books?  Nothing replaces a good theological library and all theology graduates should plan to invest in building a personal library by buying good books.  Having said that however, all modules that you will study in the LST virtual learning environment have embedded resources that we have uploaded for you and are usually just one click away. These might take the form required reading of book chapters that we have scanned and uploaded as PDF files for you, or links to external sources that will take you directly to where you need to be.  Of course, you will also have direct access through our single-sign on to a huge array of e-books and electronic journals though our online library.
    5. How much will the online BA Theology cost? LST’s BA Theology only has one fee rate, regardless of the delivery mode.  This is because we do not rank one delivery mode over the other in terms of value and our commitment is to provide to the highest quality in both delivery modes. Hence student fees are the same for on-site and online students (please see Fee Sheets).  Clearly, on-site students will also have to cover the costs of accommodation and residency which do not relate to online students.
    6. Will I need to come to London for a period of residence?  That is up to you and we would surely love to meet all our students, even just for a brief informal visit.  As indicated above however, as a BA Theology student you can choose to study completely online, in which case you will never need to come to our London campus. We can even mail you your degree, should you (sadly) not be able to attend your graduation.   
    Is the online BA Theology for you?
    1. There is not doubt that the experience of an on-campus degree at LST is unique,  but the experience of studying online is just as unique and may be exactly what is right for you.  We expect that many of those who have commitments to work, family or ministry or that are unable to obtain residence in the UK, will discover new approaches to learning and coommunity as they take up the opportunity to study online. 
    2. So is an online degree the same as an on-campus degree in all ways? Yes and no. 
    3. On the one hand yes, an online degree is the same as an on-campus degree in terms of the actual award, the learning outcomes, the course content, the LST-quality tutoring and the assessment schedule.  On the other hand clearly not. Comparing online and on-campus (also called face-to-face) learning is like comparing apples and oranges.  They are different.  One is not better than the other, but they each bring a distinctive educational experience.  Students studying on-campus will enjoy a ‘monastic type’ community, where they can focus deeply on their education, but also eat together, enjoy dorm life and share recreation and be shaped in their character within a community. They also benefit from the uniqueness of sitting in lectures and being able to walk into the offices of faculty members for informal conversations.  Living in London also has its unique value, and our on-campus students can benefit from a wealth of experiences in many churches as well as in a culture rich environment. 
    4. But as an online student you will also enjoy particular benefits in addition to the convenience of being able to reconcile a variety of life situations and study.  As you pace yourself through your studies, for example, you will acquire distinct abilities of self-discipline and focus that will transfer to many other areas of life and ministry.  You will also benefit from engaging with resources at your own pace and being able to take the necessary time for reflection in participating in online discussions, which is often appreciated if you are more introverted.  Surely remaining in your context of church, work and ministry is also a huge asset that will keep your theological study from becoming detached from real life and you will likely finding yourself applying things you learn constantly in your context and gleaning new questions and categories that arise from your context.  Much more could be said, but you can confidently also look forward to building lasting friendships through online study with people from many parts of the world that you would never meet otherwise. Although digital communication has often been a superficial and poor substitution for embodied relationships, it has great potential to be otherwise and allow you to discover you new relationships in a deeply transformative way.  
    Postgraduate DE Programmes

    There a number of validated postgraduate qualifications that are completely available by distance education: these include three Masters programmes, the MA in Aspects and Implications of Biblical Interpretation, the MA in Integrative Theology and the MA in Theological Education

    The common features of LST's MA distance education programmes include:
    • No residential requirements
    • Middlesex University validation
    • Provision of materials and tutoring
    • A variety of exit points (PGCert, PGDip, MA)
    • Final project or dissertation
    • Access to LSTOnline library resources
    The distinctives of of LST's MA distance education programmes are mainly in their content and delivery modes.

    The MAiTh is a programme focusing mainly on theology and on theological method and its application.  It is delivered residentially and also by distance education through LSTOnline with online interaction with both your tutor and fellow students.  To study this programme you need to begin on set dates and follow a calendar of units and activities that are set for your cohort.

    The MATE is a programme focusing mainly on education, theological reflection on education and its application in particular in the context of theological education.  It is only delivered by distance education with online interaction with both your tutor and fellow students.  To study this programme you need to begin on set dates and follow a calendar of units and activities that are set for your cohort.

    The MA-AIBI is a programme focusing mainly hermeneutics.  It is only delivered by distance education through printed materials. with plans to make its materials available in 2017 through LSTOnline as well.  You can begin at any time and you will study on your own in a self-paced manner with the assistance of a tutor.